Sleep Like A Dolphin

dolphin

A dolphin rests with one eye closed. (Photo credit: urosr/Shutterstock)

Has this ever happened to you? You finally arrive at your destination, ready to get a good night’s sleep so you can begin your vacation, and then you find … you simply can’t seem to get a good night’s sleep. It’s not you. It’s a phenomenon sleep researchers have long known about, called the “first-night effect” or FNE.

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Vaccination: Increasing Your Shot at a Long, Healthy Life

Vaccinations save lives. It doesn’t get much simpler than that. Today, vaccinations exist for a variety of diseases, including measles, tetanus, and everyone’s least favorite wintertime malady, influenza (i.e., the flu). But how are these vaccines developed? More important, are they safe?

vaccine

A number of illnesses and diseases can be prevented through vaccination. (Photo credit: Richard Shock/Corbis)

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A Squirrel With A Sweet Tooth

red squirrel

Red squirrels have a penchant for maple syrup. (Photo credit: Nancy Rose/Flickr/Getty Images)

The maple syrup you use to pour on your pancakes probably comes from a bottle, but one resourceful rodent goes straight to the source when it wants a taste of something sweet.

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Connecting What You Eat with How You Sleep

sleeping woman

What you eat may influence how you sleep, and vice versa. (Photo credit: Photodisc/Getty Images)

Why do you doubt your senses?”

“Because,” said Scrooge, “a little thing affects them. A slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheats. You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There’s more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!”

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Fish Flatulence — How Certain Fish Communicate in School

Most animals do not pass gas for any purpose other than necessity. In the oceans, however, there is an animal that may use flatulence as a means of communication. [Read more…]

Where Do Insects Go When it Snows?

stonefly

Some insects, such as the stonefly, thrive in the harsh conditions of winter. (Photo credit: Photo Fun/Shutterstock)

For those who don’t like the cold and snow,perhaps the one good thing about winter is the fact that were not bothered by a lot of insects. Insects, however, don’t disappear when its cold. [Read more…]

Cephalopod Intelligence Tied to Genetic Anomaly

cuttlefish

Cuttlefish (shown here), squid, and octopuses can edit their own RNA. (Photo credit: David Litman/Shutterstock)

Cephalopods, such as the squid and octopus, have long been known for their wily intelligence. Their complex behaviors include unlocking and escaping from aquarium tanks, opening jars, and communicating with one another using a system similar to Morse code. These underwater creatures, along with cuttlefishes, are all coleoids, which is a subclass of cephalopods. New research highlights another unique ability of these underwater creatures: they can edit their own RNA. [Read more…]

Think Your Dog is Smart? Probably Not as Smart as the Wolf

dachshund

Is a wolf smarter than your beloved pet dog?
(Photo credit: Elayne/Fotolia)

You probably think your dog is pretty smart. And you may be right. Dogs sometimes seem to be able to read our minds, knowing exactly what we’re thinking and what we’re going to do before it’s even clear to us. However, recent research indicates that their wild ancestor, the wolf, may have an edge in some intelligence competitions. [Read more…]

World’s Oldest Homo sapiens Fossils Discovered

hominin skull

These images show two views of a composite reconstruction of the earliest known Homo sapiens fossils discovered in Jebel Irhoud, Morocco. (Photo credit: Philipp Gunz/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology)

It’s time to rewrite the textbooks. Until now, the oldest known Homo sapiens fossils, found in Omo Kibish in Ethiopia, dated to 195,000 years ago. The new fossils, discovered in Jebel Irhoud in Morocco, date to approximately 300,000 years ago. This means the new findings predate the previous oldest-known fossils by over 100,000 years.

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Want to Prevent Algal Blooms? Toilet Train Birds

cormorants resting on a rock in a lake

While they may not be the sole cause, recent research shows that an increase in the population of cormorants on a lake in South Korea may have contributed to algal blooms.(Photo credit: EAGiven/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images)

Algal blooms are a rapid increase in the population of algae in a body of water. They are characterized by their bright green color. While they can be an entirely natural phenomenon, algal blooms can be very harmful. They can deplete lakes of oxygen, produce toxins, and ultimately kill much of the aquatic life. [Read more…]