Want to Prevent Algal Blooms? Toilet Train Birds

cormorants resting on a rock in a lake

While they may not be the sole cause, recent research shows that an increase in the population of cormorants on a lake in South Korea may have contributed to algal blooms.(Photo credit: EAGiven/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images)

Algal blooms are a rapid increase in the population of algae in a body of water. They are characterized by their bright green color. While they can be an entirely natural phenomenon, algal blooms can be very harmful. They can deplete lakes of oxygen, produce toxins, and ultimately kill much of the aquatic life. [Read more…]

Scientists Trigger Artificial Photosynthesis

blue LEDs

Researchers have developed a method to trigger photosynthesis using synthetic materials and blue light. (Photo credit: Mifid/Shutterstock)

Researchers have successfully triggered artificial photosynthesis in a synthetic material, producing both clean air and energy at the same time. This process may one day be used to in the development of technology that simultaneously reduces greenhouse gases and produces clean energy.  [Read more…]

A Breath of Fresh Fructose?

naked mole rat

Described by some as looking like “bratwurst with teeth,” naked mole rats live in communities with social structures resembling beehives, are coldblooded like reptiles, and now are known to get energy from fructose, like a plant. (Photo credit: Ger Bosma/Alamy)

It’s difficult to find an odder animal than the naked mole rat (Heterosphalus glaber). A native of east African deserts, these mammals live more like bees, in complex, underground societies complete with a queen who gives birth to worker offspring who will never reproduce.  [Read more…]

Promising New Drug Prevents Spread of Melanoma

dermatologist checking moles

Researchers have discovered a chemical compounds that prevents the spread of melanoma by up to 90 percent. (Photo credit: JPC-PROD/Shutterstock)

According to the Melanoma Research Foundation, every hour of every day one American dies from melanoma–that’s approximately 10,000 people per year. [Read more…]

The Secret’s in the Knots

brown recluse

A series of tiny knots make the silk of a brown recluse spider super strong. (Photo credit: Miles Boyer/Shutterstock)

Though most infamous for its deadly venomous bite, the brown recluse is also known for its unusual silk. Now researchers have discovered the secret behind the construction of this dangerous spider’s unique silk. [Read more…]

How Do Trees Survive the Long, Dark Winter?

winter trees

Like other living organisms that inhabit cold climates, the main issue a tree must contend with in cold conditions is the prevention ice crystal formation within its cells. (Photo credit: Corbis)

Leafless tree branches set against a snowy backdrop set a rather bleak scene. However, while it may appear lifeless, deciduous trees have several strategies to survive the cold and dark conditions of winter. [Read more…]

What’s That Smell?

corpse flower

The corpse flower can sure raise a stink. (Photo credit: Isabelle OHara/Shutterstock)

Its aroma is likened to that of decaying flesh or rotting meat. All who have gotten a whiff firsthand agree it’s a scent you won’t soon forget.  [Read more…]

A Long Winter’s Nap No More

hibernating bear

Many bears hibernate during the long, cold, and dark winter months. (Photo credit: Ralph A. Clevenger/Corbis)

When temperatures get colder and the days get shorter, many mammals settle into a period of hibernation. But what effect will climate change — and the associated changes in weather patterns — have on this annual behavior? [Read more…]

Convinced Your Dog is Smart? You Might Be Right

guide dog

Humans have long recognized the alertness, trainability, and friendly temperament of many dog breeds and pressed them into service for such very personal tasks as serving as trusted guides for the visually impaired. New research out of Hungary shows that dogs may possess an even more beautiful mind the previously thought.(Photo credit: bobbymn/iStockphoto.com)

If you have a dog, you probably think yours is the smartest dog in the world. New research from Hungary just may prove you’re correct. [Read more…]

I Am Mouse, Hear Me Roar

mouse

Mice and many other rodents make ultrasonic sounds that they use to attract mates and defend territories. (Photo credit: Digital Zoo/Getty Images)

Stammering speech, or stuttering, has traditionally been thought to be an indication of anxiety or stress. A large amount of evidence, however, has long supported the idea that it must have some genetic component. For instance, identical twins often both stutter, as do other family members. In 2008, scientists at the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders identified that those who stuttered often had a mutation in the gene Gnptab. The discovery was particularly interesting, because, previously, the gene had only been believed to be related to “general housekeeping” of the body, such as digestion. How could a gene that affects every cell of the body cause something so mechanical as stuttering? [Read more…]