Scientists Trigger Artificial Photosynthesis

blue LEDs

Researchers have developed a method to trigger photosynthesis using synthetic materials and blue light. (Photo credit: Mifid/Shutterstock)

Researchers have successfully triggered artificial photosynthesis in a synthetic material, producing both clean air and energy at the same time. This process may one day be used to in the development of technology that simultaneously reduces greenhouse gases and produces clean energy.  [Read more…]

A Breath of Fresh Fructose?

naked mole rat

Described by some as looking like “bratwurst with teeth,” naked mole rats live in communities with social structures resembling beehives, are coldblooded like reptiles, and now are known to get energy from fructose, like a plant. (Photo credit: Ger Bosma/Alamy)

It’s difficult to find an odder animal than the naked mole rat (Heterosphalus glaber). A native of east African deserts, these mammals live more like bees, in complex, underground societies complete with a queen who gives birth to worker offspring who will never reproduce.  [Read more…]

Promising New Drug Prevents Spread of Melanoma

dermatologist checking moles

Researchers have discovered a chemical compounds that prevents the spread of melanoma by up to 90 percent. (Photo credit: JPC-PROD/Shutterstock)

According to the Melanoma Research Foundation, every hour of every day one American dies from melanoma–that’s approximately 10,000 people per year. [Read more…]

The Secret’s in the Knots

brown recluse

A series of tiny knots make the silk of a brown recluse spider super strong. (Photo credit: Miles Boyer/Shutterstock)

Though most infamous for its deadly venomous bite, the brown recluse is also known for its unusual silk. Now researchers have discovered the secret behind the construction of this dangerous spider’s unique silk. [Read more…]

How Do Trees Survive the Long, Dark Winter?

winter trees

Like other living organisms that inhabit cold climates, the main issue a tree must contend with in cold conditions is the prevention ice crystal formation within its cells. (Photo credit: Corbis)

Leafless tree branches set against a snowy backdrop set a rather bleak scene. However, while it may appear lifeless, deciduous trees have several strategies to survive the cold and dark conditions of winter. [Read more…]

Measles Declared Eradicated in the Region of the Americas

measles virus

The measles virus is highly contagious and can cause serious health complications. (Art credit: Mehau Kulyk/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)

The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) recently declared that the Region of the Americas (which includes 48 member countries and territories in North, Central, and South America) is the first in the world to completely eliminate the measles virus. The eradication of the measles virus was the culmination of a 22-year effort focused on vaccinating populations against measles, mumps, and rubella. [Read more…]

A “Sixth Sense”? It May Be in Your Genes

blind-folded woman

Scientists have discovered proteins responsible for proprioception. (Photo credit: Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock)

As senses go, touch might be the least understood. While touch-associated maladies do exist, we don’t often read about sufferers from them. A team of researchers at the Scripps Research Institute spent decades looking into how organisms perceive changes in temperature and pressure. [Read more…]

This Antenna Has Teeth: The Psychic Sawfish

sawfish

The sawfish’s snout is an incredible tool. (Photo credit: TOM MCHUGH/Getty Images)

In cartoons, a sawfish could find itself being unwittingly plucked from the water to serve as a handy tool for any number of purposes. In reality, the long, sharp-toothed snouts of these shark relatives are found to be something much more than an appendage reminiscent of a handsaw. [Read more…]

Hate Cilantro? Blame Your Genes

New research indicates that your love (or hate) for cilantro depends on your genes. (Photo credit: Marnie Burkhart/Fancy/Alamy Images)

When it comes to the taste of cilantro in a spicy bowl of soup or wrapped up in a burrito, where do you stand? Do you find its taste refreshing? Or does it seem like you’re eating a mouthful of soap? This seemingly-benign herb elicits a love-hate relationship for many people. New research indicates that your genes may dictate your initial reaction to the flavor of this green herb.

[Read more…]

Meet the Dung Beetle, Keen Navigator by Starlight

dung beetle

Dung beetles use starlight to navigate at night. (Photo credit: Cathy Withers-Clarke/Shutterstock)

It’s a disgusting way to live, but dung beetles do it … and thereby deserve their unenviable name. Males of the species seek out steaming piles of manure, descend on them, shape some of the smelly stuff into balls, and roll them away from chaos of the pile, hopefully attracting a mate along the way. [Read more…]