Promising New Drug Prevents Spread of Melanoma

dermatologist checking moles

Researchers have discovered a chemical compounds that prevents the spread of melanoma by up to 90 percent. (Photo credit: JPC-PROD/Shutterstock)

According to the Melanoma Research Foundation, every hour of every day one American dies from melanoma–that’s approximately 10,000 people per year. [Read more…]

Getting to Know the Groundhog

Punxsutawney Phil

Punxsutawney Phil and his handler. (Photo credit: Corbis)

On February 2nd, all eyes turn to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, home of the groundhog, Punxsutawney Phil. Local lore has it that this groundhog can predict the following six weeks of weather. If he sees his shadow, then six more weeks of winter are in order. If he does not see his shadow, then an early spring is on the way.

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How Do Trees Survive the Long, Dark Winter?

winter trees

Like other living organisms that inhabit cold climates, the main issue a tree must contend with in cold conditions is the prevention ice crystal formation within its cells. (Photo credit: Corbis)

Leafless tree branches set against a snowy backdrop set a rather bleak scene. However, while it may appear lifeless, deciduous trees have several strategies to survive the cold and dark conditions of winter. [Read more…]

A Long Winter’s Nap No More

hibernating bear

Many bears hibernate during the long, cold, and dark winter months. (Photo credit: Ralph A. Clevenger/Corbis)

When temperatures get colder and the days get shorter, many mammals settle into a period of hibernation. But what effect will climate change — and the associated changes in weather patterns — have on this annual behavior? [Read more…]

Bringing Heritage Turkeys Back to the Thanksgiving Table

turkey_crop

Turkey is a common sight on Thanksgiving. (Photo credit: Photodisc/Getty Images)

The centerpiece of many Thanksgiving dinners in the United States is a roasted turkey. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), it is expected that over 243 million broad-breasted white turkeys–the standard turkey found in your local supermarket–will be raised in the United States. [Read more…]

Measles Declared Eradicated in the Region of the Americas

measles virus

The measles virus is highly contagious and can cause serious health complications. (Art credit: Mehau Kulyk/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)

The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) recently declared that the Region of the Americas (which includes 48 member countries and territories in North, Central, and South America) is the first in the world to completely eliminate the measles virus. The eradication of the measles virus was the culmination of a 22-year effort focused on vaccinating populations against measles, mumps, and rubella. [Read more…]

Practice Makes Perfect When It Comes to Birdsong

bird singing

Singing before daybreak helps songbirds to perfect their repertoire. (Photo credit: zakharov aleksey/Shutterstock Images)

It’s pitch black outside, but you can hear a bird trilling its little heart out. Why would a bird start singing before the sun rises? Doesn’t it know you’re still trying to get a little shuteye before the day begins? Scientists at Canada’s University of Lethbridge think they might have found the answer. [Read more…]

The Science Behind Maple Syrup Production

tapping maple trees for sap

As winter transitions to spring, the perfect conditions arise for collecting sap from sugar maple trees. (Photo credit: James Pintar/Shutterstock)

As winter turns to spring, syrup producers turn their eye to the weather forecast. They are in search of the perfect conditions to begin tapping sugar maple trees for sap. Have you ever wondered how sap from a maple tree is turned into a delicious topping for pancakes and waffles? [Read more…]

Ambergris: A Perfume Ingredient with an Unusual Origin

ambergris

Ambergris is a valuable substance that originates in a sperm whale’s digestive system. (Photo credit: Michael Freeman/Corbis)

When a “strange and mysterious” object washed ashore on a public beach in Wellington, New Zealand, rumors began to spread that it was ambergris. Soon after, fortune hunters arrived and tore the mysterious substance apart with shovels, collecting pieces in plastic bags. [Read more…]

Hate Cilantro? Blame Your Genes

New research indicates that your love (or hate) for cilantro depends on your genes. (Photo credit: Marnie Burkhart/Fancy/Alamy Images)

When it comes to the taste of cilantro in a spicy bowl of soup or wrapped up in a burrito, where do you stand? Do you find its taste refreshing? Or does it seem like you’re eating a mouthful of soap? This seemingly-benign herb elicits a love-hate relationship for many people. New research indicates that your genes may dictate your initial reaction to the flavor of this green herb.

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